Home > Personal Effectiveness, PersonalSuccessNetwork > The Joy of Job Offer Negotiation

The Joy of Job Offer Negotiation

I received a call from a job search client yesterday. After hearing his question, I realized that many job search clients will need to know how to handle this situation. It went something like this, “Great news, I’m going to receive a verbal offer for the job I interviewed for last week. I’m very excited about the opportunity and will make even MORE than I did at my last job. However, the standard vacation time is two weeks and I need three. Should I try to negotiate for an extra week of vacation?

I’ve been so focused on developing content about how to FIND, APPLY TO, and INTERVIEW FOR a new job that I almost forgot to add how to NEGOTIATE favorable employment terms. As a result, I’ll be developing  “Negotiation-Acceptance-Transition” content for upcoming job search effectiveness workshops. (Side note: I’m planning to launch the complete Job Search Effectiveness training series in an on-demand video format January 1, 2011. The new website is to be located at PersonalSuccessNetwork.com. The content will focus primarily on helping professionals become much more successful in attaining their job search and career development goals).

I bet you’d like to know the answer to my client’s question. Remember that almost every answer to almost any question is SITUATIONAL. So, let us first consider the scenario: the client had been terminated from his former position as an IT Engineer about 6 months earlier. He had a total of 20 years experience with just two companies. The new job responsibilities would align nicely with his skills and experience, PLUS the client would be working for a highly desirable company. The hiring manager at this new company informed him that a formal job offer would be coming within 24 hours. During the short conversation, the hiring manager also indicated that two weeks of vacation was one of the many standard benefits.

Now what? Should my client attempt to negotiate for one extra week of vacation? My “off-the-cuff” response was a very firm YES! Are you surprised by my response? The key to being successful in this situation lies in HOW my client negotiates for the extra week of vacation. Since my client was presently out of a job, he was less leveraged than had he been employed. If he is too AGGRESSIVE with attempting to gain the extra week of vacation, he  will certainly jeopardize the job offer. However, there’s nothing wrong with my client being ASSERTIVE with his request (while simultaneously expressing his gratitude).

My recommendation? During the official verbal-offer phone call, he should first express his excitement and appreciation. Next, he needs to acknowledge the two-week standard vacation policy and politely mention that his former employers allocated three weeks to him each year. Thus, to continue with his family tradition, could he somehow earn the additional days during the upcoming year?  Even if the answer is NO, do not fret: there IS a fallback position. He would simply ask if it would be acceptable to take an extra week off each year without pay.

This is a WIN-WIN situation for the client. Why? First, he has a new job. Second, he just may end up with that extra week of paid vacation. “But what if the employer does not grant the extra week?” you may ask. Well, it’s certainly not a deal-breaker! Refusing this highly desirable position would result in waiting several more weeks before another job offer. If the client makes $52,000 per year, why would he hold out for what is essentially $1000 when he would lose much more than that for passing on this opportunity? He wouldn’t… and there it is!

To Your Success,

-Tom

Advertisements
  1. No comments yet.
  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: