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Posts Tagged ‘Career’

Tell a Great Story, Get a New Job!

September 21, 2012 2 comments

Looking for a new job? As unemployment stays high and job growth remains slow, employers will continue to hold the advantage in the hiring process. By implementing effective storytelling techniques, you can hold the advantage over the other candidates. Before I dive right into storytelling, however, let’s briefly review the basic components of an effective Job Search Preparation List (from my previous blog posts):

  • A weekly schedule with specific times blocked for conducting online job searches, networking, and follow-up;
  • Fresh, updated resumes that are customized to specific job titles and industries;
  • A completed LinkedIn profile that is professional, interesting, and inviting;
  • Positive energy and enthusiasm, knowing that a new job is just around the corner;
  • Ability to immediately respond to any employer extending the opportunity to interview;
  • Readiness to make a high-impact, positive first impression that sticks!

How do you make a “high-impact, positive first impression that sticks?” This is a very important element to consider as you are exploring your next great role in the workforce. Per Doug Stevenson (Author of The Storytelling Method), “If you want to make a positive impression at the same time you’re making a point, you’ve got to use stories.” Doug also asks this question, “Have you ever heard someone tell a story so well that you were transported? For that moment in time, you were completely mesmerized, caught up in the magic by someone who didn’t just make you hear it, but who helped you SEE It, FEEL IT, and LIVE IT?!”

The stories you must be ready to tell are about things that took place in previous jobs, things that back up the skills and qualifications you wrote about in your resume. Since hiring managers have plenty of good candidates to choose from, expect them to ask tougher interview questions as they try to reduce candidate pools and ensure they hire the right people. If you’re not a natural storyteller, start practicing immediately. Why? Because when the hiring manager asks a behavioral-based interview question (e.g. “Please share an example of a time when you used a particular skill…”), you want to respond smoothly and confidently, ultimately triggering an internal emotional response within the interviewer.

The Bottom Line: If the interviewer(s) visualize YOU in the role, the probability that you will become their next employee (or advance to the next step of the process) increases significantly!

Fortunately, Doug Stevenson will be delivering a live presentation of his renowned “Storytelling For Business” workshop during the Pikes Peak Chapter of the American Society for Training and Development’s annual “Day With A Master” event on Tuesday, October 9th in Colorado Springs. This workshop will blend perfectly with anyone needing to improve his or her interviewing and/or presentation skills. For more information or to register, please visit http://PikesPeakASTD.org today!

Dare To Soar: Inspired By Eagles

July 31, 2011 1 comment

Do you enjoy going through the routine of life? Have you ever felt like you were created for so much more? The fact is, most people just don’t know how to leverage their true potential. This blog post is the first in a series about rising above the status quo, finding passion, and increasing personal effectiveness each day…

Eagles are fascinating creatures! They stir our adrenaline and captivate our attention like no other bird in the world. When we see an eagle flying high in the sky, time just seems to stand still. These “King of Birds” overcome the law of gravity simply by stretching their wings. Next thing you know, they’re soaring effortlessly through the sky. While all other birds are busy flapping their wings trying to get from place to place, the eagles just soar through the mist of every storm.

For centuries, the eagle has been the symbol of royalty, power, and authority. Eagles are referenced at least 32 times in the Bible, and they have appeared on statues, flags, and currency for centuries. While Benjamin Franklin strongly supported the turkey, the Founding Fathers ultimately selected the Bald Eagle as the national emblem of the United States of America in 1782. The eagle also has symbolic meaning for most Native American tribes, who still perform the traditional Eagle Dance when they have a need for divine intervention.

A bald eagle.

Image via Wikipedia

Eagles are known for their strength, size, keenness of vision, and gracefulness in flight. An interesting fact is that eagles almost always feast on fresh food. Unlike a vulture, an eagle does not eat what it finds, it finds what it wants to eat! In the same way, we have to be careful when choosing what we consume (remember, we are what we eat!). Our diet has a direct impact on our strength, energy, attitude, and effectiveness. Thus, discernment for our appetite must be clear: we must hunt, find, and consume that which we most desire.

Why do we get so uncomfortable with things we haven’t experienced before? Because, at the very core of our nature, we don’t like change. Yes, I said it: we don’t like change. We spend way too much time conforming, when what we should be doing is transforming! Many of us have wings, but always seem to be flapping them all over the place. Some of us lack passion and act as if our wings were clipped. We are neither hot nor cold, and we splash around in a bird bath of lukewarm water. We want more excitement in our life, but don’t know what we are really passionate about. What do we really need to focus on? To find out, answer these two questions:

1) Each day, what do you primarily spend your time and energy on?

2) Where would you like to spend most of your time and energy each day?

How you answer question #1 will help you to identify the priorities in your life. The answer to question #2 will help you define the gap between where you are today and where you want to be tomorrow.

There is more to come in this blog series, including the topics of Eaglets, Vultures, Molting, and Soaring. If you enjoy this blog, please share it with others. I welcome your questions and appreciate your comments. Thank you!

To Your Success,

-Tom

New Year 2011: Welcome to JOBAPALOOZA!

January 5, 2011 Leave a comment

The New Year of 2011 was welcomed with open arms. Around the world, we saw fireworks explode above Sydney Harbour, watched the Eiffel Tower sparkle like a Christmas Tree, and were entertained by a dropping ball in Times Square (sponsored by Toshiba, in case you didn’t notice). 2010 was put to rest without winning the Best Year Ever award. Nor was 2010 the runner-up. I don’t think there was even a consolation prize! 2010, R.I.P.

It is true that a high unemployment rate has continued to negatively impact thousands of professionals including ourselves, our family members, and our friends. However, I have good news: the big event is almost here! Near the start of each year, the flood gates of job postings open. This fabulous event takes place in late January and includes every industry, almost every job function, and virtually every bracket of compensation. I have taken the liberty to coin a title for this grand event: JOBAPALOOZA!

Organizations freeze the publication of many new job postings late in the year primarily due to corporate budgetary constraints. All of these about-to-be-released job postings create the framework of JOBAPALOOZA. With this  exciting event comes responsibility: each and every professional conducting a job search must be completely prepared to answer the call! Included on everyone’s Job Search Effectiveness Preparation List should be:

  1. A weekly schedule with specific times blocked for conducting online job searches, networking, and follow-up;
  2. Fresh, updated resumes that are customized to specific job titles and industries;
  3. A completed LinkedIn profile that is professional, interesting, and inviting;
  4. Positive energy and enthusiasm, knowing that a new job is just around the corner;
  5. Ability to immediately respond to any employer extending the opportunity to interview;
  6. Readiness to make a high-impact, positive first impression that sticks!

That, my friends, is a start (there’s much more to it, of course). JOBAPALOOZA is going to be incredible, with MANY professionals landing that new job. This window of opportunity will last only a few short weeks, and the biggest difference between those who WILL get the job and those who WON’T will be LEVEL OF PREPARATION. So what are you going to do? Act like a Boy Scout and BE PREPARED!

To Your Success,

-Tom

 

The Joy of Job Offer Negotiation

December 4, 2010 Leave a comment

I received a call from a job search client yesterday. After hearing his question, I realized that many job search clients will need to know how to handle this situation. It went something like this, “Great news, I’m going to receive a verbal offer for the job I interviewed for last week. I’m very excited about the opportunity and will make even MORE than I did at my last job. However, the standard vacation time is two weeks and I need three. Should I try to negotiate for an extra week of vacation?

I’ve been so focused on developing content about how to FIND, APPLY TO, and INTERVIEW FOR a new job that I almost forgot to add how to NEGOTIATE favorable employment terms. As a result, I’ll be developing  “Negotiation-Acceptance-Transition” content for upcoming job search effectiveness workshops. (Side note: I’m planning to launch the complete Job Search Effectiveness training series in an on-demand video format January 1, 2011. The new website is to be located at PersonalSuccessNetwork.com. The content will focus primarily on helping professionals become much more successful in attaining their job search and career development goals).

I bet you’d like to know the answer to my client’s question. Remember that almost every answer to almost any question is SITUATIONAL. So, let us first consider the scenario: the client had been terminated from his former position as an IT Engineer about 6 months earlier. He had a total of 20 years experience with just two companies. The new job responsibilities would align nicely with his skills and experience, PLUS the client would be working for a highly desirable company. The hiring manager at this new company informed him that a formal job offer would be coming within 24 hours. During the short conversation, the hiring manager also indicated that two weeks of vacation was one of the many standard benefits.

Now what? Should my client attempt to negotiate for one extra week of vacation? My “off-the-cuff” response was a very firm YES! Are you surprised by my response? The key to being successful in this situation lies in HOW my client negotiates for the extra week of vacation. Since my client was presently out of a job, he was less leveraged than had he been employed. If he is too AGGRESSIVE with attempting to gain the extra week of vacation, he  will certainly jeopardize the job offer. However, there’s nothing wrong with my client being ASSERTIVE with his request (while simultaneously expressing his gratitude).

My recommendation? During the official verbal-offer phone call, he should first express his excitement and appreciation. Next, he needs to acknowledge the two-week standard vacation policy and politely mention that his former employers allocated three weeks to him each year. Thus, to continue with his family tradition, could he somehow earn the additional days during the upcoming year?  Even if the answer is NO, do not fret: there IS a fallback position. He would simply ask if it would be acceptable to take an extra week off each year without pay.

This is a WIN-WIN situation for the client. Why? First, he has a new job. Second, he just may end up with that extra week of paid vacation. “But what if the employer does not grant the extra week?” you may ask. Well, it’s certainly not a deal-breaker! Refusing this highly desirable position would result in waiting several more weeks before another job offer. If the client makes $52,000 per year, why would he hold out for what is essentially $1000 when he would lose much more than that for passing on this opportunity? He wouldn’t… and there it is!

To Your Success,

-Tom